Worcester (Head Office) 0844 856 0701 Also in Bristol, Derby & Bridgend
Menu search icon

HP Designjet T795 ePrinter CR649C

Designed for those users who have a CAD plotting requirement of over A0+ size, featuring  a 44" print width you can print drawings larger than A0 size quickly in the office.

Printing a GIS application

Designed for those users who have a CAD plotting requirement of over A0+ size, featuring  a 44" print width you can print drawings larger than A0 size quickly in the office.

With automatic software updates, 16 GB of virtual memory and large ink cartridges, powerful printing comes standard in the HP DesignJet T795 Printer. Benefit from fast file processing and longer runs of unattended printing. Web connectivity and exceptional print quality means great results from virtually anywhere.

High-Quality Output of AEC Drawings

With Six cartridges on-board the T795 delivers Great Grey Scales as well as full colour output and at a low cost per print

More Images

Related Pages

Enquire now

Key Features

Wide Print Width
Large 44" Print Width for Over Sized Drawings
Big Roll Feed
up to 91 meter length roll
Full Renders
Six colour ink system for high-quality renders
Perfect for

users where oversized drawings are needed such as GIS Mapping, Railways, Mining & Utilities, otherwise we would suggest the HP Designjet T920 or T2500 if you need scanning or even full colour copying

Contact us with your questions on this product »

Product information

Dimensions and weight

Dimensions (W x D x H): 1770 x 701 x 1050 mm

Weight: 81.6 kg

What's included 

Warranty:
One-year limited on-site hardware warranty. 

What's in the box:
HP Designjet T795 1118mm ePrinter; printheads; introductory ink cartridges; printer stand; spindle; quick reference guide; setup poster; startup software; power cord

Software included:

HP ePrint & Share
HP Utility for Mac and Window

Stanford Marsh is part of the Stanford Marsh Group – the UK’s market leader in providing design technology needs

Stanford Marsh 50 Years Golden Service